English Language

Bank PO English Language Practice questions will give you the overview of the final exam and the types of questions being asked. Further, you will be able to solve the questions within the given time period. This will increase your chances of cracking the exam on the first go. Start practising with this practice set and judge your skills at every level. This will definitely give you an upper hand in the competition. Importantly, the test paper covers all the section wise questions, which have the maximum probability of being asked in the final exam.

  • Question 1

    Directions : Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow:
    As the saying goes, competition brings out the best in products, and sometimes, the worst in people. In the case of Volkswagen fuel emissions scandal, it has led to both bad products and unethical practices. The world’s largest automaker by sales, with roots in industrious Germany, stooped low to gain a foothold in the US — the second largest auto market — and pip rival Toyota, to be the lead player by hook or crook. It rigged software that turned up dubious data in nearly 11 million vehicles sold over several years. The move cost the CEO his job, wiped off $24 billion in VW’s market value, and the company will likely face billions in penalties.
    The US implements stringent fuel emission standards. But, instead of conducting its own tests, surprisingly, it relies on auto-makers for data. India too follows a similar procedure, where carmakers test vehicles at designated centres and send the results to the government for review and approval. It may be necessary to determine if our lax testing norms are/were exploited. With over 18 crore vehicles currently — likely to touch 45 crore in 2030 — India has notorious pollution levels and the onus is on the government to enforce strict regulations. As it is, our fuel emission norms are way behind developed nations that moved to Euro VI. Only 13 cities have Euro IV-compliant norms, while the rest of the country is stuck with Euro III.
    If we were to enforce higher emission limits, chances are the difference between lab and real world tests will vary widely. Hence, the government must rethink how emissions are tested. To reduce reliance on self-reported testing data, neutral third-party agencies with necessary infrastructure can be roped in to conduct tests. While it may not be feasible for the authorities to scrutinize every vehicle, surprise checks and audits should be undertaken to detect deceptions. The EU is taking steps in this direction in the wake of the VW episode. Much of the vehicular air pollution can, in fact, be avoided by maintaining proper speed and as a first step, traffic-prone metros should be de-congested. Lastly, cheating should be dealt with severely to prevent it from becoming an industry-wide malpractice.
    According to the passage, in order to fight competition Volkswagen followed?
  • Question 2

    Directions : Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow:
    As the saying goes, competition brings out the best in products, and sometimes, the worst in people. In the case of Volkswagen fuel emissions scandal, it has led to both bad products and unethical practices. The world’s largest automaker by sales, with roots in industrious Germany, stooped low to gain a foothold in the US — the second largest auto market — and pip rival Toyota, to be the lead player by hook or crook. It rigged software that turned up dubious data in nearly 11 million vehicles sold over several years. The move cost the CEO his job, wiped off $24 billion in VW’s market value, and the company will likely face billions in penalties.
    The US implements stringent fuel emission standards. But, instead of conducting its own tests, surprisingly, it relies on auto-makers for data. India too follows a similar procedure, where carmakers test vehicles at designated centres and send the results to the government for review and approval. It may be necessary to determine if our lax testing norms are/were exploited. With over 18 crore vehicles currently — likely to touch 45 crore in 2030 — India has notorious pollution levels and the onus is on the government to enforce strict regulations. As it is, our fuel emission norms are way behind developed nations that moved to Euro VI. Only 13 cities have Euro IV-compliant norms, while the rest of the country is stuck with Euro III.
    If we were to enforce higher emission limits, chances are the difference between lab and real world tests will vary widely. Hence, the government must rethink how emissions are tested. To reduce reliance on self-reported testing data, neutral third-party agencies with necessary infrastructure can be roped in to conduct tests. While it may not be feasible for the authorities to scrutinize every vehicle, surprise checks and audits should be undertaken to detect deceptions. The EU is taking steps in this direction in the wake of the VW episode. Much of the vehicular air pollution can, in fact, be avoided by maintaining proper speed and as a first step, traffic-prone metros should be de-congested. Lastly, cheating should be dealt with severely to prevent it from becoming an industry-wide malpractice.
    According to the passage, which move by Volkswagen deteriorated the image of the company?
  • Question 3

    Directions : Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow:
    As the saying goes, competition brings out the best in products, and sometimes, the worst in people. In the case of Volkswagen fuel emissions scandal, it has led to both bad products and unethical practices. The world’s largest automaker by sales, with roots in industrious Germany, stooped low to gain a foothold in the US — the second largest auto market — and pip rival Toyota, to be the lead player by hook or crook. It rigged software that turned up dubious data in nearly 11 million vehicles sold over several years. The move cost the CEO his job, wiped off $24 billion in VW’s market value, and the company will likely face billions in penalties.
    The US implements stringent fuel emission standards. But, instead of conducting its own tests, surprisingly, it relies on auto-makers for data. India too follows a similar procedure, where carmakers test vehicles at designated centres and send the results to the government for review and approval. It may be necessary to determine if our lax testing norms are/were exploited. With over 18 crore vehicles currently — likely to touch 45 crore in 2030 — India has notorious pollution levels and the onus is on the government to enforce strict regulations. As it is, our fuel emission norms are way behind developed nations that moved to Euro VI. Only 13 cities have Euro IV-compliant norms, while the rest of the country is stuck with Euro III.
    If we were to enforce higher emission limits, chances are the difference between lab and real world tests will vary widely. Hence, the government must rethink how emissions are tested. To reduce reliance on self-reported testing data, neutral third-party agencies with necessary infrastructure can be roped in to conduct tests. While it may not be feasible for the authorities to scrutinize every vehicle, surprise checks and audits should be undertaken to detect deceptions. The EU is taking steps in this direction in the wake of the VW episode. Much of the vehicular air pollution can, in fact, be avoided by maintaining proper speed and as a first step, traffic-prone metros should be de-congested. Lastly, cheating should be dealt with severely to prevent it from becoming an industry-wide malpractice.
    Volkswagen took advantage of which of the following factors?
  • Question 4

    Directions : Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow:
    As the saying goes, competition brings out the best in products, and sometimes, the worst in people. In the case of Volkswagen fuel emissions scandal, it has led to both bad products and unethical practices. The world’s largest automaker by sales, with roots in industrious Germany, stooped low to gain a foothold in the US — the second largest auto market — and pip rival Toyota, to be the lead player by hook or crook. It rigged software that turned up dubious data in nearly 11 million vehicles sold over several years. The move cost the CEO his job, wiped off $24 billion in VW’s market value, and the company will likely face billions in penalties.
    The US implements stringent fuel emission standards. But, instead of conducting its own tests, surprisingly, it relies on auto-makers for data. India too follows a similar procedure, where carmakers test vehicles at designated centres and send the results to the government for review and approval. It may be necessary to determine if our lax testing norms are/were exploited. With over 18 crore vehicles currently — likely to touch 45 crore in 2030 — India has notorious pollution levels and the onus is on the government to enforce strict regulations. As it is, our fuel emission norms are way behind developed nations that moved to Euro VI. Only 13 cities have Euro IV-compliant norms, while the rest of the country is stuck with Euro III.
    If we were to enforce higher emission limits, chances are the difference between lab and real world tests will vary widely. Hence, the government must rethink how emissions are tested. To reduce reliance on self-reported testing data, neutral third-party agencies with necessary infrastructure can be roped in to conduct tests. While it may not be feasible for the authorities to scrutinize every vehicle, surprise checks and audits should be undertaken to detect deceptions. The EU is taking steps in this direction in the wake of the VW episode. Much of the vehicular air pollution can, in fact, be avoided by maintaining proper speed and as a first step, traffic-prone metros should be de-congested. Lastly, cheating should be dealt with severely to prevent it from becoming an industry-wide malpractice.
    According to the passage, which of the emission norms is the latest one?
  • Question 5

    Directions : Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow:
    As the saying goes, competition brings out the best in products, and sometimes, the worst in people. In the case of Volkswagen fuel emissions scandal, it has led to both bad products and unethical practices. The world’s largest automaker by sales, with roots in industrious Germany, stooped low to gain a foothold in the US — the second largest auto market — and pip rival Toyota, to be the lead player by hook or crook. It rigged software that turned up dubious data in nearly 11 million vehicles sold over several years. The move cost the CEO his job, wiped off $24 billion in VW’s market value, and the company will likely face billions in penalties.
    The US implements stringent fuel emission standards. But, instead of conducting its own tests, surprisingly, it relies on auto-makers for data. India too follows a similar procedure, where carmakers test vehicles at designated centres and send the results to the government for review and approval. It may be necessary to determine if our lax testing norms are/were exploited. With over 18 crore vehicles currently — likely to touch 45 crore in 2030 — India has notorious pollution levels and the onus is on the government to enforce strict regulations. As it is, our fuel emission norms are way behind developed nations that moved to Euro VI. Only 13 cities have Euro IV-compliant norms, while the rest of the country is stuck with Euro III.
    If we were to enforce higher emission limits, chances are the difference between lab and real world tests will vary widely. Hence, the government must rethink how emissions are tested. To reduce reliance on self-reported testing data, neutral third-party agencies with necessary infrastructure can be roped in to conduct tests. While it may not be feasible for the authorities to scrutinize every vehicle, surprise checks and audits should be undertaken to detect deceptions. The EU is taking steps in this direction in the wake of the VW episode. Much of the vehicular air pollution can, in fact, be avoided by maintaining proper speed and as a first step, traffic-prone metros should be de-congested. Lastly, cheating should be dealt with severely to prevent it from becoming an industry-wide malpractice.
    According to the author of the passage, what can be the solution to enforce higher emission limits?
  • Question 6

    Directions : Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow:
    As the saying goes, competition brings out the best in products, and sometimes, the worst in people. In the case of Volkswagen fuel emissions scandal, it has led to both bad products and unethical practices. The world’s largest automaker by sales, with roots in industrious Germany, stooped low to gain a foothold in the US — the second largest auto market — and pip rival Toyota, to be the lead player by hook or crook. It rigged software that turned up dubious data in nearly 11 million vehicles sold over several years. The move cost the CEO his job, wiped off $24 billion in VW’s market value, and the company will likely face billions in penalties.
    The US implements stringent fuel emission standards. But, instead of conducting its own tests, surprisingly, it relies on auto-makers for data. India too follows a similar procedure, where carmakers test vehicles at designated centres and send the results to the government for review and approval. It may be necessary to determine if our lax testing norms are/were exploited. With over 18 crore vehicles currently — likely to touch 45 crore in 2030 — India has notorious pollution levels and the onus is on the government to enforce strict regulations. As it is, our fuel emission norms are way behind developed nations that moved to Euro VI. Only 13 cities have Euro IV-compliant norms, while the rest of the country is stuck with Euro III.
    If we were to enforce higher emission limits, chances are the difference between lab and real world tests will vary widely. Hence, the government must rethink how emissions are tested. To reduce reliance on self-reported testing data, neutral third-party agencies with necessary infrastructure can be roped in to conduct tests. While it may not be feasible for the authorities to scrutinize every vehicle, surprise checks and audits should be undertaken to detect deceptions. The EU is taking steps in this direction in the wake of the VW episode. Much of the vehicular air pollution can, in fact, be avoided by maintaining proper speed and as a first step, traffic-prone metros should be de-congested. Lastly, cheating should be dealt with severely to prevent it from becoming an industry-wide malpractice.
    According to the author of the passage, what can government do to detect deceptions created by carmakers?
  • Question 7

    Directions : Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow:
    As the saying goes, competition brings out the best in products, and sometimes, the worst in people. In the case of Volkswagen fuel emissions scandal, it has led to both bad products and unethical practices. The world’s largest automaker by sales, with roots in industrious Germany, stooped low to gain a foothold in the US — the second largest auto market — and pip rival Toyota, to be the lead player by hook or crook. It rigged software that turned up dubious data in nearly 11 million vehicles sold over several years. The move cost the CEO his job, wiped off $24 billion in VW’s market value, and the company will likely face billions in penalties.
    The US implements stringent fuel emission standards. But, instead of conducting its own tests, surprisingly, it relies on auto-makers for data. India too follows a similar procedure, where carmakers test vehicles at designated centres and send the results to the government for review and approval. It may be necessary to determine if our lax testing norms are/were exploited. With over 18 crore vehicles currently — likely to touch 45 crore in 2030 — India has notorious pollution levels and the onus is on the government to enforce strict regulations. As it is, our fuel emission norms are way behind developed nations that moved to Euro VI. Only 13 cities have Euro IV-compliant norms, while the rest of the country is stuck with Euro III.
    If we were to enforce higher emission limits, chances are the difference between lab and real world tests will vary widely. Hence, the government must rethink how emissions are tested. To reduce reliance on self-reported testing data, neutral third-party agencies with necessary infrastructure can be roped in to conduct tests. While it may not be feasible for the authorities to scrutinize every vehicle, surprise checks and audits should be undertaken to detect deceptions. The EU is taking steps in this direction in the wake of the VW episode. Much of the vehicular air pollution can, in fact, be avoided by maintaining proper speed and as a first step, traffic-prone metros should be de-congested. Lastly, cheating should be dealt with severely to prevent it from becoming an industry-wide malpractice.
    What does the author mean by the term ‘industry-wide malpractice’?
  • Question 8

    Directions: The following questions have a word highlighted from the passage with four words following it. Choose the best word that matches the meaning of the highlighted word as your answer.
    Rigged
  • Question 9

    Directions: The following questions have a word highlighted from the passage with four words following it. Choose the best word that matches the meaning of the highlighted word as your answer.
    Lax
  • Question 10

    Directions : The following questions have a word highlighted from the passage with four words following it. Choose the best word that is opposite in meaning to the highlighted word as your answer.
    Dubious
  • Question 11

    Directions : The following questions have a word highlighted from the passage with four words following it. Choose the best word that is opposite in meaning to the highlighted word as your answer.
    Scrutinize
  • Question 12

    Directions ): Rearrange the following sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) to make a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions which follow.
    (A) It merely echoed the opinion of the parties when it briefed the Supreme Court on the matter.
    (B) The Union government did not crown itself with glory when it said that political parties should not be brought under the purview of the Right to Information (RTI) Act.
    (C) This was in keeping with the spirit of the RTI because, although parties were not established under an Act, they were beneficiaries of largesse from the government in terms of land, water and other benefits.
    (D) Two years ago, the Central Information Commission had unanimously decided that the Act was applicable to political parties.(E) Therefore, the people had a right to get information about their functioning.

    (F) Political parties, cutting across ideological and regional divides, have shown such unity of purpose only on legislators’ salary and perks.
    Which of the following sentence should be the 6th (Last) after rearrangement?
  • Question 13

    Directions ): Rearrange the following sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) to make a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions which follow.
    (A) It merely echoed the opinion of the parties when it briefed the Supreme Court on the matter.
    (B) The Union government did not crown itself with glory when it said that political parties should not be brought under the purview of the Right to Information (RTI) Act.
    (C) This was in keeping with the spirit of the RTI because, although parties were not established under an Act, they were beneficiaries of largesse from the government in terms of land, water and other benefits.
    (D) Two years ago, the Central Information Commission had unanimously decided that the Act was applicable to political parties.(E) Therefore, the people had a right to get information about their functioning.

    (F) Political parties, cutting across ideological and regional divides, have shown such unity of purpose only on legislators’ salary and perks.
    Which of the following sentence should be the 4th after rearrangement?
  • Question 14

    Directions ): Rearrange the following sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) to make a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions which follow.
    (A) It merely echoed the opinion of the parties when it briefed the Supreme Court on the matter.
    (B) The Union government did not crown itself with glory when it said that political parties should not be brought under the purview of the Right to Information (RTI) Act.
    (C) This was in keeping with the spirit of the RTI because, although parties were not established under an Act, they were beneficiaries of largesse from the government in terms of land, water and other benefits.
    (D) Two years ago, the Central Information Commission had unanimously decided that the Act was applicable to political parties.(E) Therefore, the people had a right to get information about their functioning.

    (F) Political parties, cutting across ideological and regional divides, have shown such unity of purpose only on legislators’ salary and perks.
    Which of the following sentence should be the 3rd after rearrangement?
  • Question 15

    Directions ): Rearrange the following sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) to make a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions which follow.
    (A) It merely echoed the opinion of the parties when it briefed the Supreme Court on the matter.
    (B) The Union government did not crown itself with glory when it said that political parties should not be brought under the purview of the Right to Information (RTI) Act.
    (C) This was in keeping with the spirit of the RTI because, although parties were not established under an Act, they were beneficiaries of largesse from the government in terms of land, water and other benefits.
    (D) Two years ago, the Central Information Commission had unanimously decided that the Act was applicable to political parties.(E) Therefore, the people had a right to get information about their functioning.

    (F) Political parties, cutting across ideological and regional divides, have shown such unity of purpose only on legislators’ salary and perks.
    Which of the following sentence should be the 5th after rearrangement?
  • Question 16

    Directions ): Rearrange the following sentences (A), (B), (C), (D), (E) and (F) to make a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions which follow.
    (A) It merely echoed the opinion of the parties when it briefed the Supreme Court on the matter.
    (B) The Union government did not crown itself with glory when it said that political parties should not be brought under the purview of the Right to Information (RTI) Act.
    (C) This was in keeping with the spirit of the RTI because, although parties were not established under an Act, they were beneficiaries of largesse from the government in terms of land, water and other benefits.
    (D) Two years ago, the Central Information Commission had unanimously decided that the Act was applicable to political parties.(E) Therefore, the people had a right to get information about their functioning.

    (F) Political parties, cutting across ideological and regional divides, have shown such unity of purpose only on legislators’ salary and perks.
    Which of the following sentence should be the 1st after rearrangement?
  • Question 17

    Directions : Each question below has a blank indicating that something has been omitted. Choose the set of words for the blank which best fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole.
    The network will expand quickly to cover 100 of the ______________ stations in India before the end of 2016, with the remaining stations following in quick __________.
  • Question 18

    Directions : Each question below has a blank indicating that something has been omitted. Choose the set of words for the blank which best fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole.
    Indian refiners owe over $6.5 billion in past oil dues to Iran and payments are being made in a ____________ manner so that there is no pressure on ____________ rate.
  • Question 19

    Directions : Each question below has a blank indicating that something has been omitted. Choose the set of words for the blank which best fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole.
    As in 1962, India was taken ____________ by the sudden attack but it _________ quickly and opened another front in the western sector.
  • Question 20

    Directions : Each question below has a blank indicating that something has been omitted. Choose the set of words for the blank which best fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole.
    The Group of Four nations, ____________ India, Brazil, Germany and Japan, has rightly asked the United Nations to carry forward the process of reorganizing the Security Council to its ____________ conclusion.
  • Question 21

    Directions : Each question below has a blank indicating that something has been omitted. Choose the set of words for the blank which best fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole.
    A list of 98 cities has been released for development into Smart Cities, but ___________ remains in ensuring that it is _____________ and meaningful.
  • Question 22

    Directions : Each question below has a blank indicating that something has been omitted. Choose the set of words for the blank which best fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole.
    Undeniably, land is a __________ asset and developers aren’t parting with it even if it means sitting on huge ___________ inventory.
  • Question 23

    Directions : In the following passage, there are blanks each of which has been numbered. For each number some words are suggested below the passage, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find the appropriate words.
    Curiously, many states failed to pitch for towns __23__ the capitals to be developed as Smart Cities, a critical drawback as cities are expanding beyond the __24__ in metropolises. What they did was to campaign for upgrading interior municipal towns where there is hardly any trace of __25__, job creation or access to quality higher education. While developing rural towns like Thanjavur and Dindigul in Tamil Nadu or Muzaffarpur and Bhagalpur in Bihar would help bridge the urban-rural divide, an unhealthy side-effect could see the realty sector playing __26__ just as what had happened to second-tier towns during the IT boom. As the European model has shown, funding and thrust on developing physical and digital infrastructures alone cannot create __27__ Smart Cities. By their very nature Smart Cities can become elitist __28__. This temptation has to be fought so that the benefits are available to everyone in our cities. The Smart City idea should be not primarily for investors, real estate sector and IT providers, but for the people.
    Answer No. 23 blank of the passage:
  • Question 24

    Directions : In the following passage, there are blanks each of which has been numbered. For each number some words are suggested below the passage, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find the appropriate words.
    Curiously, many states failed to pitch for towns __23__ the capitals to be developed as Smart Cities, a critical drawback as cities are expanding beyond the __24__ in metropolises. What they did was to campaign for upgrading interior municipal towns where there is hardly any trace of __25__, job creation or access to quality higher education. While developing rural towns like Thanjavur and Dindigul in Tamil Nadu or Muzaffarpur and Bhagalpur in Bihar would help bridge the urban-rural divide, an unhealthy side-effect could see the realty sector playing __26__ just as what had happened to second-tier towns during the IT boom. As the European model has shown, funding and thrust on developing physical and digital infrastructures alone cannot create __27__ Smart Cities. By their very nature Smart Cities can become elitist __28__. This temptation has to be fought so that the benefits are available to everyone in our cities. The Smart City idea should be not primarily for investors, real estate sector and IT providers, but for the people.
    Answer No. 24 blank of the passage:
  • Question 25

    Directions : In the following passage, there are blanks each of which has been numbered. For each number some words are suggested below the passage, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find the appropriate words.
    Curiously, many states failed to pitch for towns __23__ the capitals to be developed as Smart Cities, a critical drawback as cities are expanding beyond the __24__ in metropolises. What they did was to campaign for upgrading interior municipal towns where there is hardly any trace of __25__, job creation or access to quality higher education. While developing rural towns like Thanjavur and Dindigul in Tamil Nadu or Muzaffarpur and Bhagalpur in Bihar would help bridge the urban-rural divide, an unhealthy side-effect could see the realty sector playing __26__ just as what had happened to second-tier towns during the IT boom. As the European model has shown, funding and thrust on developing physical and digital infrastructures alone cannot create __27__ Smart Cities. By their very nature Smart Cities can become elitist __28__. This temptation has to be fought so that the benefits are available to everyone in our cities. The Smart City idea should be not primarily for investors, real estate sector and IT providers, but for the people.
    Answer No. 25 blank of the passage:
  • Question 26

    Directions : In the following passage, there are blanks each of which has been numbered. For each number some words are suggested below the passage, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find the appropriate words.
    Curiously, many states failed to pitch for towns __23__ the capitals to be developed as Smart Cities, a critical drawback as cities are expanding beyond the __24__ in metropolises. What they did was to campaign for upgrading interior municipal towns where there is hardly any trace of __25__, job creation or access to quality higher education. While developing rural towns like Thanjavur and Dindigul in Tamil Nadu or Muzaffarpur and Bhagalpur in Bihar would help bridge the urban-rural divide, an unhealthy side-effect could see the realty sector playing __26__ just as what had happened to second-tier towns during the IT boom. As the European model has shown, funding and thrust on developing physical and digital infrastructures alone cannot create __27__ Smart Cities. By their very nature Smart Cities can become elitist __28__. This temptation has to be fought so that the benefits are available to everyone in our cities. The Smart City idea should be not primarily for investors, real estate sector and IT providers, but for the people.
    Answer No. 26 blank of the passage:
  • Question 27

    Directions : In the following passage, there are blanks each of which has been numbered. For each number some words are suggested below the passage, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find the appropriate words.
    Curiously, many states failed to pitch for towns __23__ the capitals to be developed as Smart Cities, a critical drawback as cities are expanding beyond the __24__ in metropolises. What they did was to campaign for upgrading interior municipal towns where there is hardly any trace of __25__, job creation or access to quality higher education. While developing rural towns like Thanjavur and Dindigul in Tamil Nadu or Muzaffarpur and Bhagalpur in Bihar would help bridge the urban-rural divide, an unhealthy side-effect could see the realty sector playing __26__ just as what had happened to second-tier towns during the IT boom. As the European model has shown, funding and thrust on developing physical and digital infrastructures alone cannot create __27__ Smart Cities. By their very nature Smart Cities can become elitist __28__. This temptation has to be fought so that the benefits are available to everyone in our cities. The Smart City idea should be not primarily for investors, real estate sector and IT providers, but for the people.
    Answer No. 27 blank of the passage:
  • Question 28

    Directions : In the following passage, there are blanks each of which has been numbered. For each number some words are suggested below the passage, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find the appropriate words.
    Curiously, many states failed to pitch for towns __23__ the capitals to be developed as Smart Cities, a critical drawback as cities are expanding beyond the __24__ in metropolises. What they did was to campaign for upgrading interior municipal towns where there is hardly any trace of __25__, job creation or access to quality higher education. While developing rural towns like Thanjavur and Dindigul in Tamil Nadu or Muzaffarpur and Bhagalpur in Bihar would help bridge the urban-rural divide, an unhealthy side-effect could see the realty sector playing __26__ just as what had happened to second-tier towns during the IT boom. As the European model has shown, funding and thrust on developing physical and digital infrastructures alone cannot create __27__ Smart Cities. By their very nature Smart Cities can become elitist __28__. This temptation has to be fought so that the benefits are available to everyone in our cities. The Smart City idea should be not primarily for investors, real estate sector and IT providers, but for the people.
    Answer No. 28 blank of the passage:
  • Question 29

    Directions : In each of the following questions there are four parts a, b and c, among which one part is erroneous.Find out which part of the sentence has an error and mark ‘d’ if no error is found. Ignore punctuation errors.
  • Question 30

    Directions : In each of the following questions there are four parts a, b and c, among which one part is erroneous.Find out which part of the sentence has an error and mark ‘d’ if no error is found. Ignore punctuation errors..
  • Question 31

    Directions : In each of the following questions there are four parts a, b and c, among which one part is erroneous.Find out which part of the sentence has an error and mark ‘d’ if no error is found. Ignore punctuation errors…
  • Question 32

    Directions : In each of the following questions there are four parts a, b and c, among which one part is erroneous.Find out which part of the sentence has an error and mark ‘d’ if no error is found. Ignore punctuation errors….
  • Question 33

    Directions : In each of the following questions there are four parts a, b and c, among which one part is erroneous.Find out which part of the sentence has an error and mark ‘d’ if no error is found. Ignore punctuation errors…..
  • Question 34

    Directions : In each of the following questions there are four parts a, b and c, among which one part is erroneous. Find out which part of the sentence has an error and mark ‘d’ if no error is found. Ignore punctuation errors…….
  • Question 35

    Directions : In each of the following questions there are four parts a, b and c, among which one part is erroneous. Find out which part of the sentence has an error and mark ‘d’ if no error is found. Ignore punctuation errors………..