Reading Comprehension

Are you willing to enhance your verbal ability skills in order to crack any government competitive exam? If yes, then make sure to take these verbal ability quizzes based on questions from Reading Comprehension. This will not only harness your skills but also save your time in your preparation for other sections as well. These quizzes are designed as per prevailing exam pattern and exam trends that will give you an overview of how to proceed in the main competitive entrance tests. So, what are you waiting for? Simply, take these quizzes and measure the level of your preparation now!

  • Q1.Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the question that follow:

    Passage - 2

    The Korean Peninsula is no stranger to tensions. But the ultimatum given by North Korea to the South to either stop its propaganda broadcasts across the demilitarized zone (DMZ) or face war has raised them to their highest level in many years. The Koreas are still technically at war, as the 1950-53 Korean War ended with an armistice agreement and not a proper ceasefire. Since then there have been several incidents of border violence, and leaders on both sides have occasionally exchanged high-decibel rhetoric. The latest flare-up is particularly menacing because of at least two factors — the growing unpredictability of the North Korean regime under Kim Jong-un, and the relatively more assertive response by South Korea to provocations. The North is going through several internal challenges. At least 70 top-level government officials, including the Vice-Premier, were reportedly executed since Mr. Kim took power in 2011, indicating that the regime is using brute force to sustain itself and silence dissent. Second, the North Korean state media have confirmed that the country is facing the “worst drought” in a century. This spells a major economic crisis. Whipping up tensions with the South could be a deliberate strategy on the part of Mr. Kim in order to divert attention from crucial internal problems. The latest crisis started with a landmine blast in the DMZ in which two South Korean soldiers were injured. Seoul retaliated by resuming anti-North propaganda, which led to shelling from the North and counter-artillery fire from the South.
    While the two countries have not had a full-scale armed conflict since 1953, tensions on the peninsula have remained high, particularly after the North went nuclear in 2006. With the U.S. remaining committed to “defending” South Korea, any major confrontation between the North and the South could potentially lead to a nuclear conflagration. South Korea’s dilemma is understandable. Dealing with an erratic dictatorship will never be easy. But responding to provocations from the North in the same coin is not going to serve its interests. Seoul should rather regain its rational restraint, and use diplomatic means to tone down tensions. It could reach out to China, the only major ally of the North, to put pressure on Pyongyang. If Beijing is serious about taking a more proactive regional leadership role, North Korea will be the best starting point. The recent Iran nuclear deal shows that even complicated international issues could be resolved through imaginative diplomacy. But whether the Koreans and their respective backers have the will to earnestly pursue a diplomatic solution is the big question.
    According to the author of the passage what could be the most dangerous consequence of confrontation between North Korea and South Korea?

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  • Q2.Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the question that follow:

    Passage - 2

    The Korean Peninsula is no stranger to tensions. But the ultimatum given by North Korea to the South to either stop its propaganda broadcasts across the demilitarized zone (DMZ) or face war has raised them to their highest level in many years. The Koreas are still technically at war, as the 1950-53 Korean War ended with an armistice agreement and not a proper ceasefire. Since then there have been several incidents of border violence, and leaders on both sides have occasionally exchanged high-decibel rhetoric. The latest flare-up is particularly menacing because of at least two factors — the growing unpredictability of the North Korean regime under Kim Jong-un, and the relatively more assertive response by South Korea to provocations. The North is going through several internal challenges. At least 70 top-level government officials, including the Vice-Premier, were reportedly executed since Mr. Kim took power in 2011, indicating that the regime is using brute force to sustain itself and silence dissent. Second, the North Korean state media have confirmed that the country is facing the “worst drought” in a century. This spells a major economic crisis. Whipping up tensions with the South could be a deliberate strategy on the part of Mr. Kim in order to divert attention from crucial internal problems. The latest crisis started with a landmine blast in the DMZ in which two South Korean soldiers were injured. Seoul retaliated by resuming anti-North propaganda, which led to shelling from the North and counter-artillery fire from the South.
    While the two countries have not had a full-scale armed conflict since 1953, tensions on the peninsula have remained high, particularly after the North went nuclear in 2006. With the U.S. remaining committed to “defending” South Korea, any major confrontation between the North and the South could potentially lead to a nuclear conflagration. South Korea’s dilemma is understandable. Dealing with an erratic dictatorship will never be easy. But responding to provocations from the North in the same coin is not going to serve its interests. Seoul should rather regain its rational restraint, and use diplomatic means to tone down tensions. It could reach out to China, the only major ally of the North, to put pressure on Pyongyang. If Beijing is serious about taking a more proactive regional leadership role, North Korea will be the best starting point. The recent Iran nuclear deal shows that even complicated international issues could be resolved through imaginative diplomacy. But whether the Koreans and their respective backers have the will to earnestly pursue a diplomatic solution is the big question.
    According to the passage, Seoul belongs to which part of the Korean Peninsula?

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  • Q3.Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the question that follow:

    Passage - 2

    The Korean Peninsula is no stranger to tensions. But the ultimatum given by North Korea to the South to either stop its propaganda broadcasts across the demilitarized zone (DMZ) or face war has raised them to their highest level in many years. The Koreas are still technically at war, as the 1950-53 Korean War ended with an armistice agreement and not a proper ceasefire. Since then there have been several incidents of border violence, and leaders on both sides have occasionally exchanged high-decibel rhetoric. The latest flare-up is particularly menacing because of at least two factors — the growing unpredictability of the North Korean regime under Kim Jong-un, and the relatively more assertive response by South Korea to provocations. The North is going through several internal challenges. At least 70 top-level government officials, including the Vice-Premier, were reportedly executed since Mr. Kim took power in 2011, indicating that the regime is using brute force to sustain itself and silence dissent. Second, the North Korean state media have confirmed that the country is facing the “worst drought” in a century. This spells a major economic crisis. Whipping up tensions with the South could be a deliberate strategy on the part of Mr. Kim in order to divert attention from crucial internal problems. The latest crisis started with a landmine blast in the DMZ in which two South Korean soldiers were injured. Seoul retaliated by resuming anti-North propaganda, which led to shelling from the North and counter-artillery fire from the South.
    While the two countries have not had a full-scale armed conflict since 1953, tensions on the peninsula have remained high, particularly after the North went nuclear in 2006. With the U.S. remaining committed to “defending” South Korea, any major confrontation between the North and the South could potentially lead to a nuclear conflagration. South Korea’s dilemma is understandable. Dealing with an erratic dictatorship will never be easy. But responding to provocations from the North in the same coin is not going to serve its interests. Seoul should rather regain its rational restraint, and use diplomatic means to tone down tensions. It could reach out to China, the only major ally of the North, to put pressure on Pyongyang. If Beijing is serious about taking a more proactive regional leadership role, North Korea will be the best starting point. The recent Iran nuclear deal shows that even complicated international issues could be resolved through imaginative diplomacy. But whether the Koreans and their respective backers have the will to earnestly pursue a diplomatic solution is the big question.
    What is triggering a major economic crisis in Korea?

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  • Q4.Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the question that follow:

    Passage - 2

    The Korean Peninsula is no stranger to tensions. But the ultimatum given by North Korea to the South to either stop its propaganda broadcasts across the demilitarized zone (DMZ) or face war has raised them to their highest level in many years. The Koreas are still technically at war, as the 1950-53 Korean War ended with an armistice agreement and not a proper ceasefire. Since then there have been several incidents of border violence, and leaders on both sides have occasionally exchanged high-decibel rhetoric. The latest flare-up is particularly menacing because of at least two factors — the growing unpredictability of the North Korean regime under Kim Jong-un, and the relatively more assertive response by South Korea to provocations. The North is going through several internal challenges. At least 70 top-level government officials, including the Vice-Premier, were reportedly executed since Mr. Kim took power in 2011, indicating that the regime is using brute force to sustain itself and silence dissent. Second, the North Korean state media have confirmed that the country is facing the “worst drought” in a century. This spells a major economic crisis. Whipping up tensions with the South could be a deliberate strategy on the part of Mr. Kim in order to divert attention from crucial internal problems. The latest crisis started with a landmine blast in the DMZ in which two South Korean soldiers were injured. Seoul retaliated by resuming anti-North propaganda, which led to shelling from the North and counter-artillery fire from the South.
    While the two countries have not had a full-scale armed conflict since 1953, tensions on the peninsula have remained high, particularly after the North went nuclear in 2006. With the U.S. remaining committed to “defending” South Korea, any major confrontation between the North and the South could potentially lead to a nuclear conflagration. South Korea’s dilemma is understandable. Dealing with an erratic dictatorship will never be easy. But responding to provocations from the North in the same coin is not going to serve its interests. Seoul should rather regain its rational restraint, and use diplomatic means to tone down tensions. It could reach out to China, the only major ally of the North, to put pressure on Pyongyang. If Beijing is serious about taking a more proactive regional leadership role, North Korea will be the best starting point. The recent Iran nuclear deal shows that even complicated international issues could be resolved through imaginative diplomacy. But whether the Koreans and their respective backers have the will to earnestly pursue a diplomatic solution is the big question.
    What does the author mean by the term ‘high-decibel rhetoric’ in the passage?

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  • Q5.Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the question that follow:

    Passage - 2

    The Korean Peninsula is no stranger to tensions. But the ultimatum given by North Korea to the South to either stop its propaganda broadcasts across the demilitarized zone (DMZ) or face war has raised them to their highest level in many years. The Koreas are still technically at war, as the 1950-53 Korean War ended with an armistice agreement and not a proper ceasefire. Since then there have been several incidents of border violence, and leaders on both sides have occasionally exchanged high-decibel rhetoric. The latest flare-up is particularly menacing because of at least two factors — the growing unpredictability of the North Korean regime under Kim Jong-un, and the relatively more assertive response by South Korea to provocations. The North is going through several internal challenges. At least 70 top-level government officials, including the Vice-Premier, were reportedly executed since Mr. Kim took power in 2011, indicating that the regime is using brute force to sustain itself and silence dissent. Second, the North Korean state media have confirmed that the country is facing the “worst drought” in a century. This spells a major economic crisis. Whipping up tensions with the South could be a deliberate strategy on the part of Mr. Kim in order to divert attention from crucial internal problems. The latest crisis started with a landmine blast in the DMZ in which two South Korean soldiers were injured. Seoul retaliated by resuming anti-North propaganda, which led to shelling from the North and counter-artillery fire from the South.
    While the two countries have not had a full-scale armed conflict since 1953, tensions on the peninsula have remained high, particularly after the North went nuclear in 2006. With the U.S. remaining committed to “defending” South Korea, any major confrontation between the North and the South could potentially lead to a nuclear conflagration. South Korea’s dilemma is understandable. Dealing with an erratic dictatorship will never be easy. But responding to provocations from the North in the same coin is not going to serve its interests. Seoul should rather regain its rational restraint, and use diplomatic means to tone down tensions. It could reach out to China, the only major ally of the North, to put pressure on Pyongyang. If Beijing is serious about taking a more proactive regional leadership role, North Korea will be the best starting point. The recent Iran nuclear deal shows that even complicated international issues could be resolved through imaginative diplomacy. But whether the Koreans and their respective backers have the will to earnestly pursue a diplomatic solution is the big question.
    According to the passage, Korean Peninsula is facing which tension over the years?

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  • Q6.Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the question that follow:

    Passage - 1

    China has virtually rejected Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s proposal to clarify positions on the Line of Actual Control and said it prefers an agreement with India on a Code of Conduct to maintain peace along the border. Pressed on why China has reservations on the LAC clarification, which Modi said would help both sides to know their positions, Chinese spokesperson Huang Xilian said it was tried a few years ago but ran into difficulties. This should come as no surprise to policy makers in New Delhi as Beijing has been adopting dilatory tactics to take advantage of the uncertainty on border demarcation. A clarification on the actual position will impart a sense of finality to the LAC, making it difficult for China to say that Arunachal Pradesh is “southern Tibet”.
    An element of haziness helps Chinese designs of encroaching on Indian Territory. Its code of conduct proposal will only lead to certain protocols being followed if there are transgressions of the unmarked border by Chinese or Indian forward patrols so that the intrusions do not flare up. India should acknowledge the reality of China playing a devious cat-and-mouse game and prepare to respond with a clear-headed policy without getting ballistic. India must also behave as the cat and not allow China alone to assume the predatory role.
    China’s aggressiveness in South China Sea also has to be countered by India in consultation with the US, Japan, Vietnam and other Southeast Asian nations by taking steps that would lead to stability in the region. Reports that China is building new artificial islands suggest it is bent on stoking tension to scare away India and the other nations. But, the latter should make it abundantly clear by word and deed that China cannot treat the sea as an inland lake and must learn to respect the access of its neighbours to international waters. To drive home this point, joint naval exercises may be necessary by India, Japan and Vietnam to lay down the lines of actual control on the sea to let Beijing know that its concept of being the Middle Kingdom surrounded by vassal states is outdated. Much of Chinese posturing may be intended by the country’s authoritarian rulers to impress its people. But, Beijing can’t be allowed to do as it pleases.
    According to the passage, what should be the cause of concern of the neighboring countries of China?

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  • Q7.Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the question that follow:

    Passage - 1

    China has virtually rejected Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s proposal to clarify positions on the Line of Actual Control and said it prefers an agreement with India on a Code of Conduct to maintain peace along the border. Pressed on why China has reservations on the LAC clarification, which Modi said would help both sides to know their positions, Chinese spokesperson Huang Xilian said it was tried a few years ago but ran into difficulties. This should come as no surprise to policy makers in New Delhi as Beijing has been adopting dilatory tactics to take advantage of the uncertainty on border demarcation. A clarification on the actual position will impart a sense of finality to the LAC, making it difficult for China to say that Arunachal Pradesh is “southern Tibet”.
    An element of haziness helps Chinese designs of encroaching on Indian Territory. Its code of conduct proposal will only lead to certain protocols being followed if there are transgressions of the unmarked border by Chinese or Indian forward patrols so that the intrusions do not flare up. India should acknowledge the reality of China playing a devious cat-and-mouse game and prepare to respond with a clear-headed policy without getting ballistic. India must also behave as the cat and not allow China alone to assume the predatory role.
    China’s aggressiveness in South China Sea also has to be countered by India in consultation with the US, Japan, Vietnam and other Southeast Asian nations by taking steps that would lead to stability in the region. Reports that China is building new artificial islands suggest it is bent on stoking tension to scare away India and the other nations. But, the latter should make it abundantly clear by word and deed that China cannot treat the sea as an inland lake and must learn to respect the access of its neighbours to international waters. To drive home this point, joint naval exercises may be necessary by India, Japan and Vietnam to lay down the lines of actual control on the sea to let Beijing know that its concept of being the Middle Kingdom surrounded by vassal states is outdated. Much of Chinese posturing may be intended by the country’s authoritarian rulers to impress its people. But, Beijing can’t be allowed to do as it pleases.
    Presently, who is playing the predatory role in cat-and-mouse game between India and China?

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  • Q8.Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the question that follow:

    Passage - 1

    China has virtually rejected Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s proposal to clarify positions on the Line of Actual Control and said it prefers an agreement with India on a Code of Conduct to maintain peace along the border. Pressed on why China has reservations on the LAC clarification, which Modi said would help both sides to know their positions, Chinese spokesperson Huang Xilian said it was tried a few years ago but ran into difficulties. This should come as no surprise to policy makers in New Delhi as Beijing has been adopting dilatory tactics to take advantage of the uncertainty on border demarcation. A clarification on the actual position will impart a sense of finality to the LAC, making it difficult for China to say that Arunachal Pradesh is “southern Tibet”.
    An element of haziness helps Chinese designs of encroaching on Indian Territory. Its code of conduct proposal will only lead to certain protocols being followed if there are transgressions of the unmarked border by Chinese or Indian forward patrols so that the intrusions do not flare up. India should acknowledge the reality of China playing a devious cat-and-mouse game and prepare to respond with a clear-headed policy without getting ballistic. India must also behave as the cat and not allow China alone to assume the predatory role.
    China’s aggressiveness in South China Sea also has to be countered by India in consultation with the US, Japan, Vietnam and other Southeast Asian nations by taking steps that would lead to stability in the region. Reports that China is building new artificial islands suggest it is bent on stoking tension to scare away India and the other nations. But, the latter should make it abundantly clear by word and deed that China cannot treat the sea as an inland lake and must learn to respect the access of its neighbours to international waters. To drive home this point, joint naval exercises may be necessary by India, Japan and Vietnam to lay down the lines of actual control on the sea to let Beijing know that its concept of being the Middle Kingdom surrounded by vassal states is outdated. Much of Chinese posturing may be intended by the country’s authoritarian rulers to impress its people. But, Beijing can’t be allowed to do as it pleases.
    According to the passage, which is helping China to intrude on Indian Territory?

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  • Q9.Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the question that follow:

    Passage - 1

    China has virtually rejected Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s proposal to clarify positions on the Line of Actual Control and said it prefers an agreement with India on a Code of Conduct to maintain peace along the border. Pressed on why China has reservations on the LAC clarification, which Modi said would help both sides to know their positions, Chinese spokesperson Huang Xilian said it was tried a few years ago but ran into difficulties. This should come as no surprise to policy makers in New Delhi as Beijing has been adopting dilatory tactics to take advantage of the uncertainty on border demarcation. A clarification on the actual position will impart a sense of finality to the LAC, making it difficult for China to say that Arunachal Pradesh is “southern Tibet”.
    An element of haziness helps Chinese designs of encroaching on Indian Territory. Its code of conduct proposal will only lead to certain protocols being followed if there are transgressions of the unmarked border by Chinese or Indian forward patrols so that the intrusions do not flare up. India should acknowledge the reality of China playing a devious cat-and-mouse game and prepare to respond with a clear-headed policy without getting ballistic. India must also behave as the cat and not allow China alone to assume the predatory role.
    China’s aggressiveness in South China Sea also has to be countered by India in consultation with the US, Japan, Vietnam and other Southeast Asian nations by taking steps that would lead to stability in the region. Reports that China is building new artificial islands suggest it is bent on stoking tension to scare away India and the other nations. But, the latter should make it abundantly clear by word and deed that China cannot treat the sea as an inland lake and must learn to respect the access of its neighbours to international waters. To drive home this point, joint naval exercises may be necessary by India, Japan and Vietnam to lay down the lines of actual control on the sea to let Beijing know that its concept of being the Middle Kingdom surrounded by vassal states is outdated. Much of Chinese posturing may be intended by the country’s authoritarian rulers to impress its people. But, Beijing can’t be allowed to do as it pleases.
    In reference to the passage, what does the term ‘adopting dilatory tactics’ means?

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  • Q10.Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the question that follow:

    Passage - 1

    China has virtually rejected Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s proposal to clarify positions on the Line of Actual Control and said it prefers an agreement with India on a Code of Conduct to maintain peace along the border. Pressed on why China has reservations on the LAC clarification, which Modi said would help both sides to know their positions, Chinese spokesperson Huang Xilian said it was tried a few years ago but ran into difficulties. This should come as no surprise to policy makers in New Delhi as Beijing has been adopting dilatory tactics to take advantage of the uncertainty on border demarcation. A clarification on the actual position will impart a sense of finality to the LAC, making it difficult for China to say that Arunachal Pradesh is “southern Tibet”.
    An element of haziness helps Chinese designs of encroaching on Indian Territory. Its code of conduct proposal will only lead to certain protocols being followed if there are transgressions of the unmarked border by Chinese or Indian forward patrols so that the intrusions do not flare up. India should acknowledge the reality of China playing a devious cat-and-mouse game and prepare to respond with a clear-headed policy without getting ballistic. India must also behave as the cat and not allow China alone to assume the predatory role.
    China’s aggressiveness in South China Sea also has to be countered by India in consultation with the US, Japan, Vietnam and other Southeast Asian nations by taking steps that would lead to stability in the region. Reports that China is building new artificial islands suggest it is bent on stoking tension to scare away India and the other nations. But, the latter should make it abundantly clear by word and deed that China cannot treat the sea as an inland lake and must learn to respect the access of its neighbours to international waters. To drive home this point, joint naval exercises may be necessary by India, Japan and Vietnam to lay down the lines of actual control on the sea to let Beijing know that its concept of being the Middle Kingdom surrounded by vassal states is outdated. Much of Chinese posturing may be intended by the country’s authoritarian rulers to impress its people. But, Beijing can’t be allowed to do as it pleases.
    According to the passage, India has demanded China clarifications on:

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